biologicalmarginalia:

Fan-art of a recently (semi-) published hypothesis: that the bizarre internal structures on beaked whale skulls may be used for ‘visual’ sexual display, despite being surrounded by soft tissue. Apparently this bone — some of which is the most dense known — could still be detectable to an echo-locating beaked whale. The title of Gol’din’s article rather memorably calls them ‘antlers inside’ and… I sorta ran with it.
Gol’din P. (2014) ‘Antlers inside’: are the skull structures of beaked whales (Cetacea: Ziphiidae) used for echoic imaging and visual display? Biological Journal of the Linnean Society DOI: 10.1111/bij.12337

biologicalmarginalia:

Fan-art of a recently (semi-) published hypothesis: that the bizarre internal structures on beaked whale skulls may be used for ‘visual’ sexual display, despite being surrounded by soft tissue. Apparently this bone — some of which is the most dense known — could still be detectable to an echo-locating beaked whale. The title of Gol’din’s article rather memorably calls them ‘antlers inside’ and… I sorta ran with it.

Gol’din P. (2014) ‘Antlers inside’: are the skull structures of beaked whales (Cetacea: Ziphiidae) used for echoic imaging and visual display? Biological Journal of the Linnean Society DOI: 10.1111/bij.12337

instagram:


Juxtapositions of Old and New in Tumbaco, Ecuador with @ivankphoto
To see more of Ivan Kashinsky’s photos from “Project Mi Barrio” follow @ivankphoto or browse the #projectmibarrio hashtag.
In the small town of Tumbaco not far from Ecuador’s bustling capital city of Quito, the traditional ways of life are changing quickly. A superhighway is under construction. A new shopping mall sells name brand clothes. Corn fields are valuable real estate for apartment buildings. The folkways passed on for generations exist simultaneously with the latest digital devices.
In his series “Project Mi Barrio” on Instagram, photojournalist Ivan Kashinsky (@ivankphoto) shares these fascinating juxtapositions taking place every day. “The Ecuador that I’ve been documenting for the last 10 years, is going through a titanic shift,” says Ivan. “Old indigenous ladies walk their cows though the streets as people wait impatiently in their brand new sparkling clean SUVs. I am watching the old Ecuador slam into the new Ecuador right in front of my eyes. It’s a double-score when the two come together face to face.”
Project Mi Barrio is also about exploring the consequences of this global shift towards modernization. “Will people be happier as we slip into the future?” he asks. “What is being lost? These are the questions I want people to be thinking about when they see my images.”
Zoom Info
instagram:


Juxtapositions of Old and New in Tumbaco, Ecuador with @ivankphoto
To see more of Ivan Kashinsky’s photos from “Project Mi Barrio” follow @ivankphoto or browse the #projectmibarrio hashtag.
In the small town of Tumbaco not far from Ecuador’s bustling capital city of Quito, the traditional ways of life are changing quickly. A superhighway is under construction. A new shopping mall sells name brand clothes. Corn fields are valuable real estate for apartment buildings. The folkways passed on for generations exist simultaneously with the latest digital devices.
In his series “Project Mi Barrio” on Instagram, photojournalist Ivan Kashinsky (@ivankphoto) shares these fascinating juxtapositions taking place every day. “The Ecuador that I’ve been documenting for the last 10 years, is going through a titanic shift,” says Ivan. “Old indigenous ladies walk their cows though the streets as people wait impatiently in their brand new sparkling clean SUVs. I am watching the old Ecuador slam into the new Ecuador right in front of my eyes. It’s a double-score when the two come together face to face.”
Project Mi Barrio is also about exploring the consequences of this global shift towards modernization. “Will people be happier as we slip into the future?” he asks. “What is being lost? These are the questions I want people to be thinking about when they see my images.”
Zoom Info
instagram:


Juxtapositions of Old and New in Tumbaco, Ecuador with @ivankphoto
To see more of Ivan Kashinsky’s photos from “Project Mi Barrio” follow @ivankphoto or browse the #projectmibarrio hashtag.
In the small town of Tumbaco not far from Ecuador’s bustling capital city of Quito, the traditional ways of life are changing quickly. A superhighway is under construction. A new shopping mall sells name brand clothes. Corn fields are valuable real estate for apartment buildings. The folkways passed on for generations exist simultaneously with the latest digital devices.
In his series “Project Mi Barrio” on Instagram, photojournalist Ivan Kashinsky (@ivankphoto) shares these fascinating juxtapositions taking place every day. “The Ecuador that I’ve been documenting for the last 10 years, is going through a titanic shift,” says Ivan. “Old indigenous ladies walk their cows though the streets as people wait impatiently in their brand new sparkling clean SUVs. I am watching the old Ecuador slam into the new Ecuador right in front of my eyes. It’s a double-score when the two come together face to face.”
Project Mi Barrio is also about exploring the consequences of this global shift towards modernization. “Will people be happier as we slip into the future?” he asks. “What is being lost? These are the questions I want people to be thinking about when they see my images.”
Zoom Info
instagram:


Juxtapositions of Old and New in Tumbaco, Ecuador with @ivankphoto
To see more of Ivan Kashinsky’s photos from “Project Mi Barrio” follow @ivankphoto or browse the #projectmibarrio hashtag.
In the small town of Tumbaco not far from Ecuador’s bustling capital city of Quito, the traditional ways of life are changing quickly. A superhighway is under construction. A new shopping mall sells name brand clothes. Corn fields are valuable real estate for apartment buildings. The folkways passed on for generations exist simultaneously with the latest digital devices.
In his series “Project Mi Barrio” on Instagram, photojournalist Ivan Kashinsky (@ivankphoto) shares these fascinating juxtapositions taking place every day. “The Ecuador that I’ve been documenting for the last 10 years, is going through a titanic shift,” says Ivan. “Old indigenous ladies walk their cows though the streets as people wait impatiently in their brand new sparkling clean SUVs. I am watching the old Ecuador slam into the new Ecuador right in front of my eyes. It’s a double-score when the two come together face to face.”
Project Mi Barrio is also about exploring the consequences of this global shift towards modernization. “Will people be happier as we slip into the future?” he asks. “What is being lost? These are the questions I want people to be thinking about when they see my images.”
Zoom Info
instagram:


Juxtapositions of Old and New in Tumbaco, Ecuador with @ivankphoto
To see more of Ivan Kashinsky’s photos from “Project Mi Barrio” follow @ivankphoto or browse the #projectmibarrio hashtag.
In the small town of Tumbaco not far from Ecuador’s bustling capital city of Quito, the traditional ways of life are changing quickly. A superhighway is under construction. A new shopping mall sells name brand clothes. Corn fields are valuable real estate for apartment buildings. The folkways passed on for generations exist simultaneously with the latest digital devices.
In his series “Project Mi Barrio” on Instagram, photojournalist Ivan Kashinsky (@ivankphoto) shares these fascinating juxtapositions taking place every day. “The Ecuador that I’ve been documenting for the last 10 years, is going through a titanic shift,” says Ivan. “Old indigenous ladies walk their cows though the streets as people wait impatiently in their brand new sparkling clean SUVs. I am watching the old Ecuador slam into the new Ecuador right in front of my eyes. It’s a double-score when the two come together face to face.”
Project Mi Barrio is also about exploring the consequences of this global shift towards modernization. “Will people be happier as we slip into the future?” he asks. “What is being lost? These are the questions I want people to be thinking about when they see my images.”
Zoom Info
instagram:


Juxtapositions of Old and New in Tumbaco, Ecuador with @ivankphoto
To see more of Ivan Kashinsky’s photos from “Project Mi Barrio” follow @ivankphoto or browse the #projectmibarrio hashtag.
In the small town of Tumbaco not far from Ecuador’s bustling capital city of Quito, the traditional ways of life are changing quickly. A superhighway is under construction. A new shopping mall sells name brand clothes. Corn fields are valuable real estate for apartment buildings. The folkways passed on for generations exist simultaneously with the latest digital devices.
In his series “Project Mi Barrio” on Instagram, photojournalist Ivan Kashinsky (@ivankphoto) shares these fascinating juxtapositions taking place every day. “The Ecuador that I’ve been documenting for the last 10 years, is going through a titanic shift,” says Ivan. “Old indigenous ladies walk their cows though the streets as people wait impatiently in their brand new sparkling clean SUVs. I am watching the old Ecuador slam into the new Ecuador right in front of my eyes. It’s a double-score when the two come together face to face.”
Project Mi Barrio is also about exploring the consequences of this global shift towards modernization. “Will people be happier as we slip into the future?” he asks. “What is being lost? These are the questions I want people to be thinking about when they see my images.”
Zoom Info
instagram:


Juxtapositions of Old and New in Tumbaco, Ecuador with @ivankphoto
To see more of Ivan Kashinsky’s photos from “Project Mi Barrio” follow @ivankphoto or browse the #projectmibarrio hashtag.
In the small town of Tumbaco not far from Ecuador’s bustling capital city of Quito, the traditional ways of life are changing quickly. A superhighway is under construction. A new shopping mall sells name brand clothes. Corn fields are valuable real estate for apartment buildings. The folkways passed on for generations exist simultaneously with the latest digital devices.
In his series “Project Mi Barrio” on Instagram, photojournalist Ivan Kashinsky (@ivankphoto) shares these fascinating juxtapositions taking place every day. “The Ecuador that I’ve been documenting for the last 10 years, is going through a titanic shift,” says Ivan. “Old indigenous ladies walk their cows though the streets as people wait impatiently in their brand new sparkling clean SUVs. I am watching the old Ecuador slam into the new Ecuador right in front of my eyes. It’s a double-score when the two come together face to face.”
Project Mi Barrio is also about exploring the consequences of this global shift towards modernization. “Will people be happier as we slip into the future?” he asks. “What is being lost? These are the questions I want people to be thinking about when they see my images.”
Zoom Info
instagram:


Juxtapositions of Old and New in Tumbaco, Ecuador with @ivankphoto
To see more of Ivan Kashinsky’s photos from “Project Mi Barrio” follow @ivankphoto or browse the #projectmibarrio hashtag.
In the small town of Tumbaco not far from Ecuador’s bustling capital city of Quito, the traditional ways of life are changing quickly. A superhighway is under construction. A new shopping mall sells name brand clothes. Corn fields are valuable real estate for apartment buildings. The folkways passed on for generations exist simultaneously with the latest digital devices.
In his series “Project Mi Barrio” on Instagram, photojournalist Ivan Kashinsky (@ivankphoto) shares these fascinating juxtapositions taking place every day. “The Ecuador that I’ve been documenting for the last 10 years, is going through a titanic shift,” says Ivan. “Old indigenous ladies walk their cows though the streets as people wait impatiently in their brand new sparkling clean SUVs. I am watching the old Ecuador slam into the new Ecuador right in front of my eyes. It’s a double-score when the two come together face to face.”
Project Mi Barrio is also about exploring the consequences of this global shift towards modernization. “Will people be happier as we slip into the future?” he asks. “What is being lost? These are the questions I want people to be thinking about when they see my images.”
Zoom Info
instagram:


Juxtapositions of Old and New in Tumbaco, Ecuador with @ivankphoto
To see more of Ivan Kashinsky’s photos from “Project Mi Barrio” follow @ivankphoto or browse the #projectmibarrio hashtag.
In the small town of Tumbaco not far from Ecuador’s bustling capital city of Quito, the traditional ways of life are changing quickly. A superhighway is under construction. A new shopping mall sells name brand clothes. Corn fields are valuable real estate for apartment buildings. The folkways passed on for generations exist simultaneously with the latest digital devices.
In his series “Project Mi Barrio” on Instagram, photojournalist Ivan Kashinsky (@ivankphoto) shares these fascinating juxtapositions taking place every day. “The Ecuador that I’ve been documenting for the last 10 years, is going through a titanic shift,” says Ivan. “Old indigenous ladies walk their cows though the streets as people wait impatiently in their brand new sparkling clean SUVs. I am watching the old Ecuador slam into the new Ecuador right in front of my eyes. It’s a double-score when the two come together face to face.”
Project Mi Barrio is also about exploring the consequences of this global shift towards modernization. “Will people be happier as we slip into the future?” he asks. “What is being lost? These are the questions I want people to be thinking about when they see my images.”
Zoom Info
instagram:


Juxtapositions of Old and New in Tumbaco, Ecuador with @ivankphoto
To see more of Ivan Kashinsky’s photos from “Project Mi Barrio” follow @ivankphoto or browse the #projectmibarrio hashtag.
In the small town of Tumbaco not far from Ecuador’s bustling capital city of Quito, the traditional ways of life are changing quickly. A superhighway is under construction. A new shopping mall sells name brand clothes. Corn fields are valuable real estate for apartment buildings. The folkways passed on for generations exist simultaneously with the latest digital devices.
In his series “Project Mi Barrio” on Instagram, photojournalist Ivan Kashinsky (@ivankphoto) shares these fascinating juxtapositions taking place every day. “The Ecuador that I’ve been documenting for the last 10 years, is going through a titanic shift,” says Ivan. “Old indigenous ladies walk their cows though the streets as people wait impatiently in their brand new sparkling clean SUVs. I am watching the old Ecuador slam into the new Ecuador right in front of my eyes. It’s a double-score when the two come together face to face.”
Project Mi Barrio is also about exploring the consequences of this global shift towards modernization. “Will people be happier as we slip into the future?” he asks. “What is being lost? These are the questions I want people to be thinking about when they see my images.”
Zoom Info

instagram:

Juxtapositions of Old and New in Tumbaco, Ecuador with @ivankphoto

To see more of Ivan Kashinsky’s photos from “Project Mi Barrio” follow @ivankphoto or browse the #projectmibarrio hashtag.

In the small town of Tumbaco not far from Ecuador’s bustling capital city of Quito, the traditional ways of life are changing quickly. A superhighway is under construction. A new shopping mall sells name brand clothes. Corn fields are valuable real estate for apartment buildings. The folkways passed on for generations exist simultaneously with the latest digital devices.

In his series “Project Mi Barrio” on Instagram, photojournalist Ivan Kashinsky (@ivankphoto) shares these fascinating juxtapositions taking place every day. “The Ecuador that I’ve been documenting for the last 10 years, is going through a titanic shift,” says Ivan. “Old indigenous ladies walk their cows though the streets as people wait impatiently in their brand new sparkling clean SUVs. I am watching the old Ecuador slam into the new Ecuador right in front of my eyes. It’s a double-score when the two come together face to face.”

Project Mi Barrio is also about exploring the consequences of this global shift towards modernization. “Will people be happier as we slip into the future?” he asks. “What is being lost? These are the questions I want people to be thinking about when they see my images.”

earth-song:

'Matteo Walch' Austrian Boy And Marmots By Caters News Agency
AUSTRIA — A nature-loving family says their 8-year-old boy has become friends with some of the Austrian Alps’ shiest creatures. “Matteo loves those animals and they are not at all afraid of him because he has a feeling towards them and they understand that,” the boy’s father, Michaela, said. ‘It’s amazing to watch the connection between a boy and his animal friends.’
Zoom Info
earth-song:

'Matteo Walch' Austrian Boy And Marmots By Caters News Agency
AUSTRIA — A nature-loving family says their 8-year-old boy has become friends with some of the Austrian Alps’ shiest creatures. “Matteo loves those animals and they are not at all afraid of him because he has a feeling towards them and they understand that,” the boy’s father, Michaela, said. ‘It’s amazing to watch the connection between a boy and his animal friends.’
Zoom Info
earth-song:

'Matteo Walch' Austrian Boy And Marmots By Caters News Agency
AUSTRIA — A nature-loving family says their 8-year-old boy has become friends with some of the Austrian Alps’ shiest creatures. “Matteo loves those animals and they are not at all afraid of him because he has a feeling towards them and they understand that,” the boy’s father, Michaela, said. ‘It’s amazing to watch the connection between a boy and his animal friends.’
Zoom Info
earth-song:

'Matteo Walch' Austrian Boy And Marmots By Caters News Agency
AUSTRIA — A nature-loving family says their 8-year-old boy has become friends with some of the Austrian Alps’ shiest creatures. “Matteo loves those animals and they are not at all afraid of him because he has a feeling towards them and they understand that,” the boy’s father, Michaela, said. ‘It’s amazing to watch the connection between a boy and his animal friends.’
Zoom Info
earth-song:

'Matteo Walch' Austrian Boy And Marmots By Caters News Agency
AUSTRIA — A nature-loving family says their 8-year-old boy has become friends with some of the Austrian Alps’ shiest creatures. “Matteo loves those animals and they are not at all afraid of him because he has a feeling towards them and they understand that,” the boy’s father, Michaela, said. ‘It’s amazing to watch the connection between a boy and his animal friends.’
Zoom Info

earth-song:

'Matteo Walch' Austrian Boy And Marmots By Caters News Agency

AUSTRIA — A nature-loving family says their 8-year-old boy has become friends with some of the Austrian Alps’ shiest creatures. “Matteo loves those animals and they are not at all afraid of him because he has a feeling towards them and they understand that,” the boy’s father, Michaela, said. ‘It’s amazing to watch the connection between a boy and his animal friends.’

artandsciencejournal:

Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Zoom Info
artandsciencejournal:

Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Zoom Info
artandsciencejournal:

Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Zoom Info
artandsciencejournal:

Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Zoom Info

artandsciencejournal:

Home Sweet Home

Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).

With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 

With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.

Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?

A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.

-Anna Paluch

patuccho:

#Chimborazo #Panoramic #Landscape #ecuador #AllYouNeedIsEcuador #ecuadortravel_ig #ecotourism #agroecology #naturelovers

patuccho:

#Chimborazo #Panoramic #Landscape #ecuador #AllYouNeedIsEcuador #ecuadortravel_ig #ecotourism #agroecology #naturelovers